Workshop Tracks & Descriptions

Therapy Track

  • Holistic and Empowerment Based Therapy for Healing from Sexual Violence
    • Presenter: Jennifer Heard, LMHC; Victim Advocate Therapist; Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center
      In this workshop we will explore a holistic and empowerment based approach to therapy and how this approach can assist survivors of sexual violence on their healing journey. We will utilize case examples to look at the mind and body connection, role of vulnerability, and common concerns among survivors and provide a linkage to thinking outside of the normal therapeutic techniques for conducting therapy. We will also look at how to, as a therapist, practice self-care and minimize the impact of compassion fatigue.
  • TRE®: Tension & Trauma Releasing Exercises -- a Simple, Effective Method for Mitigating the Effects of Stress in Your Body and in Your Life (Part 1)*
    *Participants must attend Part 1 and Part 2. Each part will be offered twice as there are a limited number of 10 slots for each workshop. If possible, please bring a yoga mat with you. We will have a few on hand at the workshop. 
    • Presenter: Carla Fuquay (certified TRE® provider), MS, LMHC, CHC; Outreach Counselor/Advocate; Florida Council Against Sexual Violence 
      Modern living is stressful. But inside our bodies there is a natural mechanism for unwinding and releasing deeply held tension that has accumulated due to everyday life events, immediate or prolonged stress, or traumatic life experiences. TRE® uses a set of seven exercises which can be modified for any body type to evoke a self-controlled, muscular tremor reflex deep in the core of the body. This reflex is the body’s natural way of discharging stored energy and rebalancing the nervous system. TRE® is easily learned, has immediate impact for most people, and can be integrated into a simple daily routine to help restore a sense of inner peace and emotional resiliency. Class is not appropriate for pregnant women. (TRE®, David Berceli © Copyright, www.treforall.org) 
  • TRE®: Tension & Trauma Releasing Exercises -- a Simple, Effective Method for Mitigating the Effects of Stress in Your Body and in Your Life (Part 2)*
    *Participants must attend Part 1 and Part 2. Each part will be offered twice as there are a limited number of 10 slots for each workshop. If possible, please bring a yoga mat with you. We will have a few on hand at the workshop. 
    • Presenter: Carla Fuquay (certified TRE® provider), MS, LMHC, CHC; Outreach Counselor/Advocate; Florida Council Against Sexual Violence 
      Modern living is stressful. But inside our bodies there is a natural mechanism for unwinding and releasing deeply held tension that has accumulated due to everyday life events, immediate or prolonged stress, or traumatic life experiences. TRE® uses a set of seven exercises which can be modified for any body type to evoke a self-controlled, muscular tremor reflex deep in the core of the body. This reflex is the body’s natural way of discharging stored energy and rebalancing the nervous system. TRE® is easily learned, has immediate impact for most people, and can be integrated into a simple daily routine to help restore a sense of inner peace and emotional resiliency. Class is not appropriate for pregnant women. (TRE®, David Berceli © Copyright, www.treforall.org)
  • Sexual Trauma and Mass Shootings: Clinical Considerations
    • Presenter: Brandi Godbee-Whiting, LMHC; Lead Therapist; Victim Service Center of Central Florida
      Mass shooting casualties across the U.S. have increased in recent years resulting in experiences of trauma for survivors, bystanders, and vicarious trauma in helping professionals. Mass shootings experienced directly or indirectly may be especially traumatic for individuals with a history of sexual trauma, resulting in increased depressive symptoms and decreased belief in the benevolence of the world. Researchers and scholars call for increased awareness regarding symptom presentation and therapeutic considerations for sexual trauma survivors following mass shootings. The presenter offers clinical recommendations including symptom monitoring, empowerment healing in the context of mass shooting disempowerment, and potential treatment plan adaptations.

Human Trafficking Track (this track brought to you in partnership with Voices for Florida)

  • Not the Same Thing: The Open Doors Approach to Assisting Sex Trafficking Survivors
    • Presenters: Robyn Metcalf; Open Doors Statewide Director; Voices for Florida
      Micheala Denny; Open Doors Education and Training Director; Voices for Florida

      Sex trafficking is taking place right in public, yet it is often mislabeled as prostitution and survivors are often labelled as criminals. During this workshop, presenters will address some of the gaps in services that exist in Florida for survivors of sex trafficking, identify ways that the needs of survivors are different than other victims of crime and highlight the work of the innovative Open Doors Outreach Network.
  • Resistant or Resilient? Meeting the Needs of Youth Trafficking Survivors of Color
    • Presenter: Tyffani Dent; Psychologist; Monford Dent Consulting and Psychological Services, LLC
      This presentation will address the historical and ongoing failure of the sexual violence prevention/intervention movement to meet the needs of youth survivors of color, the social injustice that often results in the sexual abuse to prison pipeline for these youth, and ways to engage in culturally-competent interventions to meet the needs of Black and Hispanic adolescent human trafficking survivors.
  • Trauma Competent Care, Collaboration and Coordination: Serving Survivors of Sex Trafficking and Creating Lasting Change Through Collective Community Impact
    • Presenters: Linda Alexionok; President; Voices for Florida 
      Robyn Metcalf; Open Doors Statewide Director; Voices for Florida

      Old ways won’t open new doors. Survivors of sex trafficking need direct service providers who are not only trauma-informed, but also trauma competent. Building on the benchmark that sex trafficking is a community problem and that all survivors are deserving of comprehensive care, this presentation highlights the ways that public and private partnerships can be harnessed to create lasting change through collective community impact.
  • Survivor Led: Working with Survivor Mentors to Serve Victims of Sex Trafficking
    • Presenters: Jamie Rosseland; Open Doors Survivor Mentor; Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center
      Sarah Helms; Psychologist; Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center

      Survivor-Mentors, bring a bevy of valuable experience and wisdom to the work of restoration and healing of survivors of sex trafficking. As professionals, they provide an unparalleled perspective and knowledge about the experiences, needs and culture of sex trafficking victims. From the lens of a survivor mentor and her therapist, this workshop explores the role of Survivor-Mentors in providing care to other survivors and how to maximize their expertise in a supportive and non-exploitative manner.

Advocacy Track

  • Advocate Self Care: It’s More than an Annual Bubble Bath
    • Presenter: Elizabeth Bauer; SASP TA Specialist; National Sexual Assault Coalition Resource Sharing Project
      Bubble baths can be relaxing, but they can’t fix everything when you are burnt out! Self-care is often a buzzword thrown around in our field, but what does it really mean? This workshop will focus on self-care for advocates, who are often survivors, from the framework of everyday habits and tips aimed at mitigating vicarious trauma. During the workshop, participants will learn about vicarious trauma, create a realistic plan for taking care of themselves on a daily basis, and practice techniques together. The workshop presenter will follow up with participants in a few months to check on their plan.
  • Addressing Challenging Behaviors in Advocacy
    • Presenter: Amy K. Cummings-Aponte, MS; Victim Advocate Counselor; Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center
      In 2011 the Huffington Post reported over 18% of Floridians have been diagnosed with a mental illness ranging from mild depression to psychosis or personality disorders.  Many who serve victims of crimes report feeling as though they are lacking information related to mental illness and the challenging behaviors that can manifest as a result.  An article by Merchant and Whiting (2015) noted education as a supporting factor in the retention and career sustainability of those in the helping fields.  In support of that knowledge we will explore challenging behaviors advocates may encounter in survivors, determine helpful ways to interpret these behaviors, discuss resources to support creation of a successful advocacy plan, and support each other with compassion.  
  • Believing the Unbelievable
    • Presenters: Carol Messam-Gordon; Program Coordinator; Palm Beach County Victim Services & Certified Rape Crisis Center
      Sharon Daughtery; Sexual Assault Community Outreach Coordinator; Palm Beach County Victim Services & Certified Rape Crisis Center
      Sherry Britton-Susino, RN-SANE-A, SANE-P; Palm Beach County Victim Services & Certified Rape Crisis Center

      Attendees of this workshop will explore the dynamics of three unbelievable cases and discuss how misperceptions can quickly lead to disbelief. Participants will identify and discuss innate barriers to objectivity and the impact it has on their interactions with victims. Through participation in this workshop attendees will gain greater confidence in their ability to identify their personal barriers as they occur and learn to apply the “Start by Believing” concept in their service delivery.
  • Trauma & Addiction How They Are Linked and How We Can Help Those Who Suffer
    • Presenter: Rebecca Edwards; Author, Speaker, Recovery and Sexual Trauma Advocate; Living Through Experience
      Rebecca Edwards will present her life story and explain fact based principles of addiction and behaviors stemming from trauma and how they correlate with many negative life choices and the hidden reasons why so many trauma victims repeat patterns that are self-destructive, and in most cases, perpetuate further traumatization. Multiple sources of information will be presented and attendees will feel more confident in talking about dual diagnosis with behavioral science and addiction principles explained in addition to ACE Scores and 12-Steps programs.
  • Using Applied Theatre Techniques for Educational Outreach and Survivor Treatment
    • Presenter: Antonia Lassar; playwright, performer, and educator; Post Traumatic Super Delightful creator and keynote performer at FCASV 2018 Summit
      Using applied theatre techniques, Antonia Lassar, presenter of “Post Traumatic Super Delightful,” will lead participants through theatre exercises that can be practiced in a wide range of work. This workshop will demonstrate how theatre can express complex ideas to lay audiences, how it can humanize parties involved in conflict, and how it can strengthen your personal activism. Antonia will also analyze the theatrical tools used in "Post Traumatic Super Delightful," and discuss how they can be used in both educational outreach and survivor treatment.

Community Partnerships Track

  • Reading Between the Lines: Using Case File Review as a Collaborative Way to Improve the Response to Sexual Violence
    • Presenters: Jolene Engelking; Project Development Specialist; Sexual Violence Justice Institute at the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault
      Jessica Jerney; Research and Evaluation Specialist;
       Sexual Violence Justice Institute at the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault
      For those who seek justice through the criminal justice system, case files hold the “official” record of a survivor’s experience. For Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) and others working collaboratively to create systemic change, reviewing case files is a way to evaluate and reflect on what sexual assault cases look like in their community. Based on a recently released toolkit, this interactive workshop gives background to case file review and practical tools for using it to improve community response in a way that’s both victim-centered and addresses offender accountability.
  • Creating Partnerships: Moving Beyond Law Enforcement
    • Presenter: Leah Green; Rural TA Specialist; Resource Sharing Project
      Rural dual/multi-service advocacy agencies traditionally have worked closely with law enforcement, prosecution, and medical staff. While these systems have important roles in our community, many sexual assault survivors do not see these systems as part of their healing. By expanding our idea of community partners to include housing resources, faith communities, and animal shelters we can better meet the needs of sexual assault survivors.
  • Development of a Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) in a Rural Community
    • Presenters: Melissa Collins; Victim Advocate; Gulf Coast Sexual Assault Program
      Cindy Bard; Victim Advocate; Gulf Coast Sexual Assault Program

      This workshop will explore the composition, qualities, and culture of rural communities in the Panhandle of Florida served by the Gulf Coast Sexual Assault Program. Our program, established in 2015, is responsible for the development of victim support services for survivors of sexual assault. One of the many successes of the Rural Project was the development and sustainability of SART. This workshop will also share the steps our team took to create a successful SART. Additionally, the team will explore with participants the opportunities and obstacles they encountered while working in a rural community.
  • Principals of Engaging Men in Sexual Violence Prevention
    • Presenter: Dougla-Khan Stancil; Mental Health Professional; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
      Not all men rape, but the highest frequency of rape is perpetrated by men. It is essential for men to take on the responsibility and charge of going from protection to prevention. In this workshop participants will learn seven principals utilized in the mobilization of men to end violence against women. Healthy masculinity, counterstories, environmental change theory; what do these terms mean and how can they help create a safer environment for women? Learn this and more in this hands on workshop, designed to empower the practical application of men’s violence prevention.
  • Faith-based work with Black and Hispanic Survivors: The Sisters of Tamar Support Circle Project (SOTSC)
    • Presenters: Tyffani Dent; Psychologist; Monford Dent Consulting and Psychological Services, LLC
      Rosa Beltre; Executive Director; Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence

      The Black Church is often seen as a refuge and the first place Black people go when experiencing stressors or crises. However, the Black Church often lacks the resources/knowledge to address these needs as well as a reluctance to seek the support of mental health professionals within the community. One area in which the Black Church has been seen as failing to effectively intervene is in the area of addressing the needs of women sexual abuse survivors. Implications for how SOTSC can be used with Hispanic Survivors of Faith will also be explored.
  • Everything You Wanted to Know About Rural Outreach
    • Presenter: Leah Green; Rural TA Specialist; Resource Sharing Project
      Rural programs serving sexual assault survivors frequently tell us they aren’t sure how to provide outreach to rural communities. Considering the large service areas, the small staff sizes, and conservative attitudes, it’s no wonder that rural programs struggle with outreach! This workshop will focus on the importance of providing targeted outreach to sexual assault survivors with an emphasis on concrete tangible suggestions.

Children/Youth Track

  • The Development of Maladaptive Behavior in Child Sexual Abuse Victims
    • Presenter: Tracie Mitchem-Green; Doctor of Nursing Practice – Family Nurse Practitioner; Guiding Light Consulting Services LLC
      Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a worldwide epidemic. Barth, Bernetz, Heim, Trelle, Tonia (2013) found that 8% - 31% of girls and 3% -17% of boys are victims of CSA, with 9 girls and 3 boys out of 100 enduring forced intercourse. CSA is a trauma and its effects can linger into and throughout adulthood (Florida Council Against Sexual Violence, n.d.; Misurell, Springer, & Tyron, 2010). Maladaptive behavior, defined as counterproductive activity that is inappropriate to a given situation (The Free Dictionary, n.d.), is at work and this presentation provides a detailed analysis into its association with CSA victims.
  • Basic Principles and Interventions in Providing Services to Children (Part 1 – Lecture)
    • Presenters: Pamela Hope; Senior Human Services Program Specialist; Florida Department of Health in Putnam County
      Joanne O’Neil; Human Services Program Manager; Florida Department of Health in Putnam County

      This presentation will provide basic principles and interventions in providing services to children and non-offending caregivers. Participants will be provided with the foundations to meet the following three core objectives: developing services for children, basic therapeutic principles in working with traumatized children, and themes and interpretation of children’s play. Case examples and demonstrations will be used to convey the use and interpretation of artistic expression, sand tray, doll house, and role play in therapy session.
  • Basic Principles and Interventions in Providing Services to Children (Part 2 – Interactive)
    • Presenters: Pamela Hope; Senior Human Services Program Specialist; Florida Department of Health in Putnam County
      Joanne O’Neil; Human Services Program Manager; Florida Department of Health in Putnam County

      This presentation will provide basic principles and interventions in providing services to children and non-offending caregivers. Participants will be provided with the foundations to meet the following three core objectives: developing services for children, basic therapeutic principles in working with traumatized children, and themes and interpretation of children’s play. Case examples and demonstrations will be used to convey the use and interpretation of artistic expression, sand tray, doll house, and role play in therapy session.
  • Questioning Gender: Empowering the Identities of LGBTQ Youth as a form of Prevention
    • Presenter: Ian Siljestrom; Safe and Healthy Schools Coordinator; Equality Florida
      This interactive workshop will provide participants with the most up to date statistics surrounding the experiences of our LGBTQ youth, as well as best practices approaches towards responding with a culturally competent lens. Statistics will be related to teen sexual violence, dating violence, and self-harm. We will also discuss opportunities and resources to empower LGBTQ students, particularly those of whom have intersectional identities. This workshop is designed for individuals who work directly with youth, or are trying to connect more with youth and schools.
  • Film:  Blue Campaign Video and Audrie & Daisy*
    • ​*This film is 1 hour 45 minutes long so it will run over the 1 hour 15 minutes allotted for this time slot. Please plan accordingly if you intend to stay for the entirety of the film.
      Audrie & Daisy is an urgent real-life drama that examines the ripple effects on families, friends, schools and communities when two underage young women find that sexual assault crimes against them have been caught on camera. From acclaimed filmmakers Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk (The Island President, The Rape of Europa), Audrie & Daisy — which made its world premiere at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival — takes a hard look at American teenagers who are coming of age in this new world of social media bullying.

Legal Track

  • Investigating and Prosecuting Law Enforcement Sexual Misconduct
    • Presenter: Fara Gold; Special Litigation Counsel; US Department of Justice Civil Rights Division Criminal Section
      The federal government has jurisdiction to prosecute federal, state, and local law enforcement officers, probation officers, prison and jail employees, among others, who commit sexual misconduct under color of law. Victims of these crimes often feel like they cannot “report the police to the police,” and therefore these crimes do not get prosecuted. However, victims often disclose to family, clergy, hospital staff, attorneys, counselors, and other “outcry” witnesses who are unaware of the federal government’s jurisdiction and that there is another avenue to report law enforcement sexual misconduct. We will examine the outcry witness’s role; federal law; the way in which federal and state authorities can work together to hold the perpetrators accountable; and evidentiary hurdles and investigatory challenges associated with prosecuting these cases where the perpetrator is law enforcement and the victim necessarily has credibility issues because of his or her status as an arrestee, inmate, or probationer.
  • Advocating for the Employment Rights of Victims and Survivors: Challenges and Strategies
    • Presenters: Victoria Mesa-Estrada; Attorney; Florida Legal Services and Theresa Prichard; Director of Advocacy/LAV Project Director; Florida Council Against Sexual Violence
      This workshop will review anti-discrimination laws and the effects of sexual violence in the workplace. Participants will learn how to incorporate employment rights advocacy into legal representation of clients. Presenters will identify sources of protection and support available for survivors and strategies for effective litigation in employment rights for victims. 
  •  Sexual Assault Civil Remedies 101 for Non-Lawyers
    • Presenter: Chelsie Lamie; Crime Victim Attorney
      Advocates are often the ‘first responders’ to assist sexual assault survivors and while generally well-versed in the criminal system, many do not have a complete grasp of the civil justice system.  Non-lawyer participants will benefit from learning about the civil justice system and the remedies available to survivors of sexual assault.  The program will be taught using plain language, in a straight-forward manner, to ensure that advocates understand this useful information and can immediately begin applying what they have learned.
  • Film: I am Evidence* 
    • *This film is 1 hour 30 minutes long so it will run over the 1 hour 15 minutes allotted for this time slot. Please plan accordingly if you intend to stay for the entirety of the film.
      I Am Evidence exposes the alarming number of untested rape kits in the United States through a character–driven narrative, bringing much needed attention to the disturbing pattern of how the criminal justice system has historically treated sexual assault survivors. Why is there a rape kit backlog? What can we do to fix the problem? This film explores these questions through survivors’ experiences as they trace the fates of their kits and re-engage in the criminal justice process. I Am Evidence illuminates how the system has impeded justice while also highlighting those who are leading the charge to work through the backlog and pursue long-awaited justice in these cases. In this film, we seek to send a clear message to survivors that they matter, that we as a nation will do everything possible to bring them a path to healing and justice, and that their perpetrators will be held accountable for their crimes.  

Mini-Vía en Español

  • Las Voces de Sobrevivientes: El poder del uso de la terapia narrativa en grupo con sobrevivientes de agresión sexual 
    • Presentadora: Alicia Gomez; Behavioral Health Clinician; Nancy J. Cotterman Center
      Las terapias tradicionales enfocadas en el trauma han demostrado ser efectivas, pero también han sido criticadas por guiar al cliente a hablar sobre sus experiencias traumáticas. La terapia narrativa ve al cliente como experto en su vida y se enfoca en las habilidades positivas de esa persona. El uso de la terapia narrativa en un grupo de apoyo ofrece una oportunidad donde sobrevivientes sienten un ambiente comunitario, participan en cuentos comunes y contrarrestan los efectos de la vergüenza y aislamiento. Los participantes aprenderán cómo las prácticas narrativas ayudaron a las clientas de un grupo del centro de Nancy J. Cotterman a sentirse más poderosas y útiles.
  • El autocuidado en profesionales que asisten a sobrevivientes d trauma 
    • Presentadora: Julieta Wenk, LMHC; Therapist; ACT
      El tema central de este taller es el reconocimiento de las varias formas en que el trabajo con trauma (trauma sexual) puede afectar la labor y el grado de satisfacción laboral y personal en los defensores, consejeros y terapeutas dedicados a asistir a este tipo de sobreviviente; y de las formas de autocuidado necesarias para mantener un cierto nivel de efectividad y satisfacción. El taller es interactivo y se presentarán oportunidades para discusión y práctica de herramientas y actividades.
  • Film: Don't Tell Anyone (No Le Digas a Nadie) 
    • Since the age of 4, Angy Rivera has lived in the United States with a secret that threatens to upend her life: She is undocumented. Now 24 and facing an uncertain future, Rivera becomes an activist for undocumented youth with a popular advice blog and a YouTube channel boasting more than 27,000 views. She steps out of the shadows a second time to share her story of sexual abuse, an experience all too common among undocumented women. Don't Tell Anyone (No Le Digas a Nadie) follows Rivera's remarkable journey from poverty in rural Colombia to the front page of The New York TimesA co-presentation with Latino Public Broadcasting.

Incarcerated Survivors Mini-Track

  • PREA Coordination with Your Local Rape Crisis Center
    • ​Presenters: James Kenney; PREA Coordinator; Osceola County Corrections Department
      Rhonda Wilson; Lead Advocate; Victim Service Center of Central Florida 
      The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) requires that corrections facilities interact with their local rape crisis center to ensure that appropriate services are available to inmate victims of sexual abuse. The corrections facility can also be a good community partner and offer assistance to the community SART team. This interaction between the agencies can be used to provide valuable services to the inmate population. This workshop focuses on how our two agencies have successfully put this partnership to work.
  • Conducting Support Groups for Incarcerated Sexual Assault Survivors
    • Presenters: Amanda Schubert; Lead Sexual Assault Victim Advocate; SPARCC
      Ana Juvier; Rural Sexual Assault Victim Advocate; SPARCC
      This workshop focuses on providing support groups to the incarcerated survivor. The key learning objectives for this workshop will be: enhance advocates' knowledge base, explore barriers associated with seeking services, safety concerns, and specific facilitating strategies. This population faces many barriers for seeking services and often times survivors are unaware of their rights. Through effective outreach services, advocates can make a significant impact on this population and enhance the quality of services for survivors. 
  • Legal Remedies and Advocacy for Incarcerated Survivors 
    • Presenters: Andrea Costello; Director; Florida Institutional Legal Services Project of Florida Legal Services (FILS)
      Melissa Ashton; Statewide Victim Services Coordinator; Florida Council Against Sexual Violence (FCASV)
      In this workshop we will discuss an overview of the Prison Rape Elimination Act, the services that the Florida Institutional Legal Services Project provides to incarcerated survivors including legal options, resources, and how FCASV and the FILS Project are partnering to expand services to incarcerated victims of sexual violence. Participants will also engage in discussions about what needs they are seeing for incarcerated survivors in their communities and brainstorm how those gaps could be met.